By Alisa Michael

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Often I have a need to copy one worksheet to another by copying and pasting.  Whenever I have done this, I’ve had to readjust the column width which invariably takes quite a bit of time.  I finally took the time to research how to copy column widths from one sheet to another and it is fairly simple.

Copy Column Widths

11Select the range of cells you want to copy from the original worksheet.

  • Choose Edit, Copy.
  • Click on the new sheet.
  • Then click any cell in the column where you want the copied widths to begin.
  • Once you’ve done that click Edit, Paste Special, choose the Column Widths option and click Ok.

    Another great tip that my husband shared with me is how to insert bullets in a worksheet. As you have probably figured out, Excel does not have a button to create bullets in text.  There are a couple of ways to do this that could really help when preparing legal documents.

    Insert a bullet symbol into a Cell
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    The fastest way to add a bullet is to double-click in the cell where you want to add your bullet symbol, go to the Insert tab at the top of the screen and click symbol.  Here you can choose a bullet from many different symbols.  Click on the one that you want and hit Insert.  For those of you who prefer to use shortcuts, click ALT+7 using the numeric keypad.

    Do you want to add multiple lines and bullets? Easy! After inserting the first bullet, press ALT+Enter button which gives you an additional line in the same cell, then press ALT+7.

    Copy a bulleted list from Word

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    If you already have a Word document prepared with a bulleted list and want to copy that into Excel, there are two ways to do this.  The first is to insert the bulleted list so that each bulleted item appears in its own row.  Click the cell where you want the first bullet to be placed and press CRTL+V.

    Secondly, if you want to insert the entire bulleted list into a single cell, double click in the cell and press CTRL+V.

    If you find these tips helpful, you should check out Richard and Cheryl’s latest Excel tips as well – Adding Rows and Columns in Excel without Getting Your Mouse Involved and  So You Want to Build a Snowman.  Hopefully these tips will help you to save time while preparing your medical or legal spreadsheets. 

    Alisa MichaelAlisa Michael

    With over 16 years’ experience in the legal arena as well as client management, Alisa brings her experience to Network 1’s team, clients and partners.  She strives to be proactive in managing clients’ needs and expectations with an outcome of client satisfaction and retention.

    amichael@network1consulting.com or 404.997.7637

    Network 1 Consulting is a 16-year-oldIT Support company in Atlanta, GA.  We become – or augment – the IT department for law firms and medical practices.  Our IT experts can fix computers – but what our clients really value are the industry-specific best practices we bring to their firms.  This is especially important with technology, along with regulations and cyber threats, changing so rapidly.  We take a proactive approach to helping our clients use technology to gain and keep their competitive advantage.

     

     

     

     

     

    2 Comments

    1. Randal Thompson on August 7, 2014 at 6:56 pm

      Hi Alisa,

      You may know this one already if not:

      Another tip you might mention to Move or Copy a spreadsheet from a workbook with all formatting the same as the original is to:
      1. Right mouse click on the tab at the bottom
      2. Select Move or Copy
      3. In the pop-up box, click the dropdown button is wanting to move to another open spreadsheet or keep default to Book 1 for a new spreadsheet
      4. Select the Before Sheet to place it where you want it in the workbook your are Moving or Copying

      Hope it helps.

    2. Tuesday Tip – Fun and Easy Excel Tips on January 6, 2015 at 1:40 pm

      […] you save some time in 2015.  For more great Excel tips from our previous Tips, check out Alisa’s How to Excel in Excel and Richard’s Adding Rows and Columns in Excel Without Your Mouse.  Here’s to a productive New […]

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